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Biology Courses

 

Biology courese are offered in the following areas

Biology (BSB) courses

Biological Sciences (BS) courses

Microbiology (BSM) courses

Sciences/Mathematics (SM) courses 

 

Biology (BSB) courses


BSB 101 General Biology I. (3)
Lecture.
An introductory course designed to provide an overview of the following topics in biology: the scientific method, evolution, classical genetics, molecular genetics and biochemistry, mutations and molecular evolution, and population genetics.

BSB 101L General Biology I Laboratory. (1)
Laboratory.
Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: BSB 101.
A laboratory course designed to complement lectures presented in Biology 101.

BSB 102 General Biology II. (3)
Lecture.
Prerequisites: BSB 101, BSB 101L.
An introductory course designed to provide an overview of the following topics in biology: cell structure, phylogeny, physiology, and ecology.

BSB 102L General Biology II Laboratory. (1)
Laboratory.
Prerequisites: BSB 101, BSB 101L, and BSB 102, or concurrent enrollment in BSB 102.
A laboratory course designed to complement lectures presented in Biology 102.

BSB 141 Human Anatomy and Physiology I. (4)
Lecture-Laboratory.
A study of human anatomy and human physiology including the scientific method, cell theory and cell structure, tissues, the integumentary system, the skeletomuscular system, and the respiratory system.
Note: This course does not count toward the Biology major or the Biology with Teacher Certification major.

BSB 142 Human Anatomy and Physiology II. (4)
Lecture-Laboratory.
Prerequisites:  BSB 141.
A continuation of the study of human anatomy and human physiology begun in BSB 141. Topics will include the circulatory system, the excretory system, the digestive system and metabolism, the reproductive system, and the nervous system.
Note: This course does not ocunt toward the Biology major or the Biology with Teacher Certification major.

BSB 201 Humans: Origins and Ecology. (3)
Lecture.
May be used by non-science majors as a laboratory science if taken concurrently with BSB 102L.
An introductory course with emphasis on humans as a biological species, human evolution from early primates, and human ecology with considerations of populations, resource depletion, and waste production/pollution.

BSB 230 General Genetics. (4)
Lecture-Laboratory.
Prerequisites:  BSB 101 (w/lab), BSB 102 (w/lab).
An introduction to the study of the transmission and expression of genetic information. Studying molecular genetics (replication, mutation, repair, and expression of genetic material) will provide the basis of understanding of Mendelian, cellular, and population genetics. Material will include discussion of historical experiments important to the development of the field and of ethical issues raised by modern genetic technologies. This course will prepare students for more advanced topics, e.g. BSB 332 Cellular and Molecular Biology, BSM 452 Immunology, and BSB/PSC 467 Biochemistry.

BSB 251 General Botany. (4)
Lecture-Laboratory.
Prerequisites:  BSB 101 (w/lab), BSB 102 (w/lab).
A study of the comparative structure, function, and ecology of organisms that have traditionally been treated as members of the Plant Kingdom, including algae, fungi, bryophytes, and vascular plants. Particular attention will be paid to the ecological, economic, and medical importance of the groups studied.

BSB 255 Pathophysiology. (3)
Lecture.
Prerequisites: BSB 141, BSB 142
A consideration of the disturbances of normal physiology, the mechanisms producing these disturbances, and the ways in which they are expressed symptomatically.

BSB 303 Comparative Anatomy. (4)
Lecture-Laboratory.
Prerequisites:  BSB 101 (w/lab), BSB 102 (w/lab).
Comparative anatomy of the organ systems of representative vertebrate animals with emphasis on evolutionary trends in structure.

BSB 304 Research Methods. (4)
Lecture-Laboratory.
Prerequisite: 8 hours of lab-based science.
Research Methods is a non-specialized course looking at the generalities of how research is carried out, what goes into designing a strong experiment, what can be done to increase the reliability of the results, and how data from research is analyzed. We will also emphasize critical analysis of individual experiments to determine their strengths and weaknesses. Because no specialized knowledge of biology will be required, any upper-year student who has taken two semesters of a lab-based introductory science course is welcome to take this course. The lab portion of this course will involve designing well-controlled non-specialized experiments to test simple, every-day hypotheses.

BSB 310 General Ecology. (4)
Lecture-Laboratory.
Prerequisites:  BSB 230, PSC 111 (w/lab), and PSC 112 (w/lab)
A study of basic ecological principles and methods, ecosystems, communities, populations, evolutionary ecology, applications to human ecology, and selected current research topics. Saturday field trips may be planned.

BSB 313 Methods and Materials in the Teaching of Science in the Secondary School. (3)
Only open to students admitted to Teacher Education. This course is taught concurrently with PS 313.
This course is designed to give the student a knowledge of methods in the teaching of science in junior and senior high school. Emphasis will be placed on practical applications, such as laboratory preparation and safety, animal care and handling, and teaching and classroom management. Each student will have the opportunity to do some teaching in the general biology laboratories at MUW. Students will also review current reference materials on science teaching, as well as state adopted textbooks in biology.
This course does not count toward fulfillment of the requirements for the Biology major. It is for teacher certification only.

BSB 322 Animal Physiology. (4)
Lecture-Laboratory.
Prerequisites:  BSB 101 (w/lab), BSB 102 (w/lab), PSC 111 (w/lab). Corequisite: PSC 112 (w/lab).
An advanced animal physiology lecture and laboratory course that stresses principles and mechanisms of animal function. Emphasis is on the physiology of a wide spectrum of animals, both invertebrate and vertebrate, with attention given to molecular, cellular and organismic levels.

BSB 330 Advanced Genetics. (4)
Lecture-Laboratory.
Prerequisites:· BSB 230.
An advanced look at genetics, extending and amplifying some of the concepts introduced in BSB 230 General Genetics. The genetics topics covered will be determined by the instructor's areas of expertise, but may include microbial genetics and gene regulation, advanced population genetics, or eukaryotic gene regulation.

BSB 332 Cellular and Molecular Biology. (4)
Lecture-Laboratory.
Prerequisites:  BSB 230, and PSC 111 (w/lab). Corequisite: 112 (w/lab).
A one-semester survey emphasizing various molecular pathways necessary to cell functioning, including protein sorting, cell-signaling, cell cycle control, and apoptosis. This course also highlights selected techniques and tools of molecular biology used in experiments relating to the topics covered.

BSB 346 Evolutionary Biology. (4)
Lecture-Laboratory.
Prerequisites: BSB 230. Recommended: BSB 310
An overview of how evolutionary biology underpins, informs, and impacts all areas of biological thought and research. Course content will integrate evolutionary concepts with four main areas of biological science - genetics, molecular biology, organismal biology, and environmental biology.

BSB 351 Plant Physiology and Biotechnology. (4)
Lecture-Laboratory.
Prerequisites: BSB 101 (w/lab),  BSB 102 (w/lab), and PSC 111 (w/lab). Co-requisite: PSC 112 (w/lab). BSB 251 recommended.
A study of the life processes of green plants. Topics such as photosynthesis, on every level from the molecular to the ecological; transport of water and solutes; nitrogen fixation; and the physiology of stages of development from seed germination to senescence will be examined.

BSB 408 Animal Behavior. (4)
Lecture-Laboratory.
Prerequisites: BSB 230 and BSB 310; and either BSB 332 or BSB 346.
A comparative study of animal behavior with major emphasis on evolutionary, developmental, physiological, genetic, and ecological aspects of vertebrate and invertebrate animal behavior.

BSB 452 Immunology. (4)
Lecture.
Prerequisites: BSB 230. Recommended: BSB 332.
A study of modern concepts of host defense mechanisms with emphasis on how immunoglobulins are produced, as well as the processes of cellular immunity.

BSB 459 Histology. (4)
Lecture-Laboratory.
Prerequisites: BSB 230 and BSB 310; and either BSB 332 or BSB 346.
A study of the structure, ultra-structure and function of mammalian tissues, cells and organelles, with major emphasis on microscopic work in the laboratory.

BSB 461 Protein Misfolding and Human Diseases. (4)
Lecture-Laboratory.
Prerequisites: BSB 230.
In this course students will learn the basics of protein structure and the role of protein folding in human health and disease.  Diseases such as cystic fibrosis, Niemann-Pick disease, Alzheimer's disease, and Parkinson's disease will be studied as emblematic of protein misfolding disorders. Students will also learn basic biochemical techniques, and how to detect and distinguish folded from misfolded proteins.

BSB 467 Biochemistry. (4)
Lecture-Laboratory.
Prerequisites: BSB 101 (w/lab), BSB 102 (w/lab), PSC 211 (w/lab). Corequisite: PSC 212 (w/lab); Recommended: BSB 230.
A one semester survey of biochemistry emphasizing protein biochemistry (protein structure and activity, enzyme kinetics, catalytic and regulatory strategies, metabolic pathways) and introducing physical and chemical properties of carbohydrates, lipids, and nucleic acids as necessary to understand protein form and function.

BSB 485 Special Topics in Biology. (2-3)
Prerequisites: Permission of the Sciences and Mathematics Department Chair.
In-depth considerations of selected biological topics presented as a formal course or seminar format. A term paper may be required. May be repeated for a maximum of eight credit-hours.

BSB 499 Independent Study in Biology. (1-3)
Prerequisites: Permission of the Sciences and Mathematics Department Chair.
Individualized descriptive or experimental research projects or directed readings under the direction of a project director and two other faculty committee members appointed by the Sciences and Mathematics Department Chair. A written report must be approved by the committee. May be repeated for up to six credit hours.

 

Biological Sciences (BS) courses

BS 400 Senior Seminar. (2)
Seminar-Discussion.
Prerequisite: BSB 230. Prerequisites or concurrent enrollment: BSB 310, BSB 332, BSB 346 (except for biology with teacher certification majors), senior standing, and successful completion (grade of C or better) of at least 28 semester hours of BSB and/or BSM courses.
A seminar-style course with emphasis on three areas of the biological sciences: Cellular/Molecular, Genetics/Evolution, and Organismal/Environmental. Pertinent books and articles will be discussed which integrate the biological sciences at its different levels, with emphasis on broad-scale and critical thinking, general integrative themes, scientific method, history of science, and human connections.

 

Microbiology (BSM) courses

BSM 131 General Microbiology. (3)
Lecture.
Prerequisite: PS 108, PSC 111 or high school chemistry.
A study of the fundamental concepts and methods of microbiology, including morphology, physiology, biochemical activities, inheritance, basic immunology, and importance in medicine, public health and the environment.

BSM 131L General Microbiology Laboratory. (1)
Laboratory.
Prerequisite or concurrent enrollment: BSM 131 lecture.
A laboratory course designed to complement lectures in BSM 131

BSM 340 Mirobiology for Majors. (4)
Lecture-Laboratory.
Prerequisites: BSB 101, 101L, PSC 111, 111L, and EN 101.
A comprehensive study of microbial cell physiology, genetics, development and cell ultra-structure with an emphasis on the role of microorganisms in medicine, agriculture, the environment, evolution and in industry.
 
BSM 342 Food Microbiology. (4)(4)
Lecture-Laboratory.
Prerequisites: BSM 131 (w/lab) or BSM 340 (w/lab).
A course designed to provide the student with first-hand knowledge and experience in isolating, handling, and identifying microorganisms associated with food spoilage, food production, and food-borne diseases.

BSM 456 Pathogenic Microbiology. (4)
Lecture-Laboratory.
Prerequisites: BSM 340 and BSB 322 or BSB 141 and BSB 142.
Examination of the etiology, symptomatology, diagnostic and therapeutic procedures employed in the isolation and identification of medically significant microorganisms, with consideration of some aspects of their virulence and their effects on man.n.

BSM 485 Special Topics in Microbiology. (2-3)
Prerequisites: Junior standing in Biological Sciences and permission of the Sciences and Mathematics Department Chair.
In-depth considerations of selected microbiological topics presented as a formal course or seminar format. A term paper may be required. May be repeated for a maximum of six hours credit.

BSM 499 Independent Study in Microbiology. (1-3)
Prerequisites: Junior or Senior standing in Biological Sciences, successful completion (grades of C or better) of a least 24 hours of course work in the biological sciences, and permission of the Sciences and Mathematics Department Chair.
Individualized descriptive or experimental research projects or directed readings under the direction of a project director and two other faculty committee members appointed by the Sciences and Mathematics Department Chair. A written report must be approved by the committee. May be repeated for up to six hours credit.

 

Science/Mathematics (SM) courses

SM 100 Science/Mathematics Seminar. (0)
Lecture.
Pass/No Credit.
Open only to Science and Mathematics majors
Students will be exposed to a variety of research approaches, experiences, and career opportunities enabling them to gain a greater understanding of professional involvement in Science and Mathematics. Students majoring in all Science/Mathematics programs are required to pass four (4) semesters of SM 100 for graduation, except for transfer students with 60 or more transfer hours who are required to pass three (3) semesters of SM 100.

SM 101 Environmental Science I. (4)
Lecture-Laboratory.
Prerequisites: MA 113 or higher (not MA 123) or demonstrated proficiency in math.
An introductory course covering global and local topics in environmental science. Fundamental concepts in biology, physics, chemistry, and geology will be examined and applied to contemporary and historical environmental problems so that the student can synthesize the body of knowledge necessary to understand environmental issues.

SM 102 Environmental Science II. (4)
Lecture-Laboratory.
Prerequisites: MA 113 or higher (not MA 123) or demonstrated proficiency in math, SM 101
An introductory course continuing the examination of global and local topics in environmental science begun in SM 101. Emphasis will be given to critical analysis of specific problems and to understanding the models used to investigate these problems.

SM 125 Fortran. (3)
Lecture.
Prerequisites: MA 113.
This course will teach problem-solving methods using Fortran. Application will be made to problems in various fields but mathematical and scientific problems are stressed.

SM 135 Programming in C++. (3)
Lecture.
Prerequisites: MA 113.
Problem-solving methods and algorithm development using the computer programming language C++. Emphasis on scientific and mathematical applications.

SM 295 Topics in Mathematics for Teachers. (1-3)
Prerequisites: Permission of Sciences and Mathematics Department Chair.
In-depth content on selected mathematical topics, including their relation and application to the classroom. This course is primarily intended for in-service teachers. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours credit.

SM 297 Topics in Science for Teachers. (1-3)
Lecture.
Prerequisites: Permission of Sciences and Mathematics Department Chair.
In-depth content on selected science topics, including their relation and application to the classroom. This course is primarily intended for in-service teachers. May be repeated for a maximum of 6 hours credit.

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